German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine

(EurActiv, 8 Sep 2021) While German carmakers unveil their latest electric vehicles at the International Motor Show in Munich, the industry associations they are members of have made their position clear: the next German government must fight for the internal combustion engine at EU level.

In the coming weeks, EU legislators will start deliberating a European Commission proposal that would de facto impose a ban of the production of new petrol- or diesel-powered cars as of 2035.

The EU proposal was tabled on 14 July as part of a wider package of climate and energy legislation aimed at cutting the bloc’s emissions in half by the end of this decade and reach net-zero by 2050.

At present, EU-produced cars are allowed to emit 95g of carbon per kilometre. This will be scaled back by 55% by 2030, moving to 0g in 2035. Vans, which are permitted 147g/km, will face a 50% reduction by 2030, but must also be emissions free by 2035.

“Stronger CO2 emissions standards for cars and vans will accelerate the transition to zero-emission mobility,” the EU executive said when it presented the new measures in July.

But while German carmakers like Volkswagen and Daimler have embraced the shift to electric mobility and even aim to pre-empt it, industry associations BDI and VDA have started pushing back.

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EurActiv, 8 Sep 2021: German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine