How Brazil can save the Amazon through bioeconomy

(Eco Business, 7 Oct 2019) The sustainable use of land in the Amazon is crucial to achieving the objectives set on the Paris Accord and to securing food for the rest of the world. Experts based in Brazil outline ways this could be done.

The latest IPCC report on land use highlights that soil degradation accelerates the climate crisis, while sustainable land use is crucial to achieving the objectives set on the Paris Accord and to ensuring food security.

Carlos Nobre, an expert on climate variability and sustainability of tropical forests based in Brazil, proposed an idea he called Amazon 4.0 as an alternative for the country to achieve sustainable development through the exploitation of biodiversity’s economic potential.

This idea has been widely debated in public especially after the publication of the latest figures from the National Institute of Space Research (INPE) which revealed that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon reached 2.254,8 square kilometers, or 278 per cent more than the same month last year.

Those figures were highly criticised by the Brazilian government, which led to a debate aired over national television where then INPE director, Ricardo Galvão, stated that “every political leader must understand, that when dealing with scientific matters, there is no higher authority over the sovereignty of science”.

Asked about the current and complex scenario in the Amazon, Carlos Durigan, director of the World Conservation Society Brazil (WCS), explained that degradation and invasion of 50 per cent of the Amazon land where most of the indigenous communities live is due to various socioenvironmental phenomena which have been occurring in the region for some time.

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Eco Business, 7 Oct 2019: How Brazil can save the Amazon through bioeconomy