In a jam: how traffic slows urban economies

(Eco Business, 24 May 2019) As more people flock to cities, congested roads, expensive commutes and a lack of reliable transport options are disrupting urban economies and affecting quality of life.

Spiralling traffic and poor urban planning could rob developing countries of opportunities and jam economic progress in fast-growing cities, a study published on Thursday found.

As more people flock to cities, congested roads, expensive commutes and a lack of reliable transport options are disrupting urban economies and affecting quality of life, said a report by the World Resources Institute, a global research organisation.

“Cities need to shift from a primary focus on moving traffic faster and accommodating more vehicles to prioritising access for all,” said Anjali Mahendra, the report’s co-author.

“This demands much stronger integration between transport planning agencies and land developers.”

The report found 56 per cent of people in Mexico City were under-served in terms of their ability to reach job locations, against 42 per cent of residents in Johannesburg.

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Eco Business, 24 May 2019: In a jam: how traffic slows urban economies