Microgrids are powering remote communities—and helping Southeast Asia’s eco resorts live up to their name

(Eco Business, 13 Sep 2019) In a region where power demand is soaring, microgrids can increase renewable energy adoption and cut reliance on diesel. The most immediate impact, however, could be the ability to hear birdsong again.

The private island resort that she co-founded in 2012 had already invested in advanced water treatment systems, waste management and food composting.

The next step was to harness solar power and Cher Chua-Lassalvy of Batu Batu - Tengah Island, in Malaysia’s Johor Marine Park, was waiting for a good contact to come by.

At a Global Sustainable Tourism Council training event in Chiang Mai this year, she caught a presentation by Sujay Malve, the chief executive of Canopy Power, a three-year-old startup that has installed microgrids at several eco-resorts in Southeast Asia.

They had a drink after the training ended and the rest, as Chua-Lassalvy put it, is history.

Solar energy will supply about 30 per cent of Batu Batu’s energy needs when the photovoltaic-storage hybrid system is set up, and that proportion could rise further if she works with a consultant to cut energy use.

Microgrids—localised power grids that can be synced with the main grid, or be independent of it—have been touted as a way to increase renewable energy adoption, especially in regions such as Southeast Asia where power demand is soaring.

External link

Eco Business, 13 Sep 2019: Microgrids are powering remote communities—and helping Southeast Asia’s eco resorts live up to their name