Russia’s invasion of Ukraine forces Germany to come clean on energy transition strategy

(Clean Energy Wire, 28 Feb 2022) The outbreak of war in eastern Europe is sending shockwaves through Germany’s political class and is reshaping the energy transition debate, as the country’s most important energy trading partner Russia increasingly turns into a liability to international security.

Plans to enable the country’s ambitious energy transition in part with the help of Russian gas may well evaporate if the spiraling conflict severs ties between the EU and Moscow. The suspension of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline project has given a first taste. Calls are increasing for revisiting plans to exit nuclear and coal-fired power production in light of possible supply shocks, but also the view that renewables are a strategic asset is finding new supporters. Energy researchers and economists say Germany’s government and industry now face a moment of reckoning that forces them to set out a clear and determined path to climate neutrality.

The attack on Ukraine ordered by Russia’s president Vladimir Putin has delivered a blow to years of European and particularly German security and energy policy that reaches far beyond the halting of the controversial Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline project. The country’s strategy for implementing its transition to nuclear-free carbon neutrality has rested on the assumption of readily available Russian gas as a “bridge” towards a future energy system that fully relies on renewable power sources.

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Clean Energy Wire, 28 Feb 2022: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine forces Germany to come clean on energy transition strategy