Two years on, how is Russia’s invasion of Ukraine driving energy security and decarbonisation?

(Energy Post, 4 Mar 2024) Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has boosted anxiety and therefore action on energy security and dependence on oil and gas. Sanctioning Russian oil and gas imports is an opportunity to replace fossil fuels with low or no carbon alternatives, an opportunity that is being taken.

And renewables like wind and solar are by their nature local and therefore good for energy security (though with notable exceptions). Charles Hendry, Ellen Wald, Olga Khakova, Robert Ichord, Joseph Webster and Jennifer Gordon at the Atlantic Council give their take on these aspects and others. They cover the geopolitics, LNG, Ukraine’s importance to the west as an energy ally, the risk of growing dependence on China’s solar manufactures, the weakening of Russia as a global energy player, nuclear power, and more. They also give their recommendations to keep the momentum going, using the crisis to accelerate decarbonisation and energy security, and continue support for Ukraine.

Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022 has reverberated throughout the global energy landscape, significantly impacting both energy security and the ongoing transition towards sustainable energy sources. Swift action is needed to mitigate risks, strengthen resilience, and ensure that energy remains a driver of stability and prosperity in the face of geopolitical uncertainty. Our experts share their insights on the second anniversary of the war.

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Energy Post, 4 Mar 2024: Two years on, how is Russia’s invasion of Ukraine driving energy security and decarbonisation?