US: Study identifies states with best opportunities to cut costs and emissions by updating building codes using federal climate funds

(ACEEE blog, 9 Jan 2023) States could cut energy use in new buildings by as much as a third—significantly reducing utility bills and greenhouse gas emissions—by updating building energy codes with the help of new federal funds.

New analysis from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) identifies the states best positioned to take advantage of the federal funding by analyzing several factors in each state, including energy savings achievable for new buildings under a stronger code, the pace of new building construction, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from buildings. The new analysis allowed ACEEE to evaluate how stronger codes could help states meet their climate targets.

The study comes as unprecedented federal resources become available to states to update building codes. Last month, the Department of Energy announced the first $45 million of a five-year, $225 million grant program—established by the 2021 bipartisan infrastructure law—to help states and localities implement updated building energy codes. The Inflation Reduction Act will provide another $1 billion to help states and local jurisdictions adopt and implement stronger codes.

Building energy codes set requirements for building construction, such as for insulation, windows, or heating systems. Stronger codes reduce energy use in new buildings and thus cut utility costs and GHG emissions from burning fuels in the buildings and from power plants that provide the buildings with electricity.

External link

ACEEE blog, 9 Jan 2023: US: Study identifies states with best opportunities to cut costs and emissions by updating building codes using federal climate funds